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Why Is Training Important to Careers

Why Is Training Important to  Careers

When deciding on juvenile justice as a possible career field, it is useful to narrow things down to a few types of positions within this rather vague area. Before finally electing to pursue a particular job within juvenile justice, training should be a fundamental consideration. For one, with most categories of juvenile justice, school (meaning a college degree of some sort) will be a foregone conclusion. In fact, for certain professions, multiple degrees might be needed among other qualifications. Plus, this does not even count any subsequent juvenile justice training that is localized to working in a given district.
Becoming certified in a specific subset of juvenile justice is definitely a process, and thus, is nothing to take lightly. Some notes about juvenile justice training based on possible career paths:
In terms of getting an education in some facet of juvenile justice, school may be an afterthought for some people. After all, if they wish to learn about juvenile justice, they might assume that they may just be able to attend a juvenile justice school. However, at the undergraduate level and beyond, this is an impractical assumption.
As far as credible institutions go, there really is no such thing as a juvenile justice school. Instead, the best one will probably be able to do regarding a general interest in juvenile justice is to enroll at a college or university that is heralded for its criminal justice course(s) of study and take classes germane to juvenile justice. School programs with juvenile justice in the name are likely just research initiatives and/or informational resources.
Then again, juvenile justice training in the form of a college degree is not always a necessity. For example, juvenile corrections officers working at the county and State level may only need a minimum of a high school diploma or equivalent certification and completion of some college courses. Even then, those credits may be negligible if an applicant has experience with law enforcement or military service.
Once a  position is secured, however, the real juvenile justice training begins. Among the needed skills tests to be passed are firearms proficiency and self-defense knowledge. Still, some sort of college degree will generally be required to practice and these things will vary from role to role in the juvenile justice system.
Social workers, for example, will need at least a bachelor’s degree in social work, and in some settings, a master’s degree. Lawyers will need to get an undergraduate education, go through law school, and pass the Bar Exam. Judges, meanwhile, must usually complete the steps to become a lawyer and receive a formal appointment or be elected by their constituents.

Easy Guide of Types Careers

Easy Guide of Types Careers

There are many important jobs involved in the juvenile justice system.
Judge: Of all the jobs in juvenile justice, the position of juvenile court judge is one of the most esteemed and typically commands the highest salaries out of any in the area of juvenile justice. Among the responsibilities of a juvenile court judge are hearing the testimony of witnesses and arguments of legal representatives in adjudication court to assess the culpability of the child, deciding upon a plan of action for a child outside of court, and determining the correct forum for a hearing (e.g. criminal). 
Attorney: Seeing as it was already mentioned, one can also bet he or she will be placed in a prominent position in a juvenile court as an attorney.
Corrections Officer: Some jobs in juvenile justice, meanwhile, do not require people to set foot in a courtroom, as some suspects/guilty parties will be detained/committed for a time. The work of a correctional officer, for example, is a form of juvenile justice employment that may only see the employee serve within a secure facility or other youth detention center. In this environment, people on the job should expect to enforce the rules of the institution, inspect inmates and the premises for evidence of wrongdoing, and enforce appropriate punishment as needed. Applicants should be apprised of the fact, though, that this line of work is one of the worst in terms of on-the-job injuries, so one must have the physical and mental fortitude for a potentially contentious environment.
Counselor: While perhaps not exclusively a form of juvenile justice employment, the role of counselor may be included in the category of “jobs in juvenile justice” based on some of the issues that certain juvenile delinquents may face. Juvenile crime/delinquency is often accompanied by issues in other areas, such as mental health, substance abuse, employing long-term strategies to help them cope with the problems they face and helping them deal with the struggles the recovery process may entail. While not always highly compensated for the roles, the value of counselors’ services is truly priceless.    

Knowing the Benefits and Difficulties

Knowing the Benefits and Difficulties

On the positive side of things, doing any juvenile justice job or making any juvenile justice career is rendering a service to one’s community. Realistically, the persistence of juvenile delinquency in the United States is not merely the failure of government, schools, or parents, but the collective failure of our communities to help “our” children. At that, to be a member of the juvenile justice system is to assist those who are among the most needy of all in our communities: delinquent children and children at risk. From a moral/ethical standpoint, this is a commendable line of work.
Thus, to contemplate a juvenile justice career is to contemplate a career full of children that much of society does not really want. Rather than do the hard work of trying to reform them, some individuals would just as well have juvenile delinquents locked up and out of the way, and certainly would not wish to interact with them. The more people that shy away from a particular juvenile justice job, though, the more available that position will become. Definitely, one should consider the objections of people he or she knows and respects, but depending on the nature of the work, the job security could be a tantalizing prospect.
However, as much as some people are resistant about starting a juvenile justice career, they will also likely be resistant in funding them. Some positions within the field of juvenile justice are not well compensated and so the moral incentive to do these kinds of jobs is tempered by the strain this could put on people’s spending. In some cases, too, this may be related to the insufficient resources some justice departments get. Truly, without the proper means, it can be hard to make a difference in these children’s lives.

Understanding Careers

Understanding Careers

Depending on one’s chosen field, only a handful of positions might be available in that area of interest. For example, classes and training in the field of ophthalmology will imaginably prove quite limiting as to what one’s career aspirations are, though for some, this might be perfectly fine. 
Juvenile justice justice jobs are a different story. Right off the bat, for those who are used to working a normal nine-to-five job or otherwise expect to clock in and out at established hours, certain juvenile justice careers may not be realistic prospects. For those that work in a court setting, for example, most positions will exceed the “standard” 40-hour week. Juvenile court judges may conform to the norm, but may also just as easily work 50 hours per week.
Depending on the position, an individual might also be expected to work during the nights and on weekends. While these may be relatively small concessions to those who are dedicated to their task and really love what they do, for others unwilling to bite the bullet, so to speak, or with other considerations like children that limit the flexibility of their schedules, alternatives are recommended.
People thinking about juvenile justice careers should also understand the kind of environment in which they will likely be working. The aforementioned juvenile court judge would preside over a juvenile court.         
For all the hardships that come along with some juvenile justice careers, the potential benefits may more than make up for their inconveniences. Judges, for one, tend to start on a higher pay scale. As for the correctional officer, he or she will generally work that regular shift that some people might covet. For the social worker/caseworker position, while the pay is generally low, the demand for these jobs is often quite high. With all of these positions, there is a decided trade-off. Job seekers and career planners are urged to think about which one works best for them.