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Abduction Statistics

Facts You Need to Know About The Country Wide Child Abduction Statistics

Facts You Need to Know About The Country Wide Child Abduction Statistics

Each year, 800,000 missing children, approximately 2,000 children every day, are reported to local law enforcement agencies and the FBI. Most of these cases were solved within hours or cases that were not serious (such as an overstay with a particular parent).
Every 40 seconds, a child becomes missing or abducted. In comparison, every three seconds, a child is admitted to an emergency room.
Family child abduction is the most common form of abduction in the United States. Almost half of child abductions are kidnappings by a parent or other family relative. These abductions are generally not serious.
More than 25 percent of child abductions are by an acquaintance of the child, generally involving a high percentage of juveniles. This type of abduction carries the highest percentage of injuries.
Less than one quarter of child abductions are by a stranger, with more girls being abducted than boys. This type of abduction is the most dangerous. Approximately 80 percent of child abductions by strangers occur within 1/4 of a mile of the child’s home. Roughly 75 percent of abduction murders occur within 3 hours after the child goes missing. 
An overwhelming majority of acquaintance or stranger child abductions victimize girls. More parents fear their child being abducted than they fear car accidents or any other crime against their children.
Only one in every 10,000 missing child reports result in the death of the child. The overwhelming majority of non-family child abductions (80 percent) are motivated by sexual intentions. 
The chance that a child is kidnapped and murdered stands at about 1 in every 347,000. 90 percent of stranger kidnappings are committed by males aged 20-40 years old. Less than 5 percent of children kidnapped by strangers are never found, while 99 percent of abductions committed by a family member or acquaintance result in reunification of child and parent.
As these child abduction statistics show, the fear felt by parents about the subject of child abduction, while understandable, is exaggerated. Most American child abductions are by parents or family members. Parents should understand that teaching their children to be safe and maintaining parental supervision, especially of younger children, is the best they can do to prevent child abduction affecting their family.

What Are The Trends in Child Abduction

What Are The Trends in Child Abduction

High profile cases of child abduction have dominated media and the minds of the American people. The amount of coverage and recognition that these high profile cases carry have led to a general consensus that child abductions by strangers are common and present a risk to all unsupervised or hapless children.
However, trends in child abductions show that this is not the case. In the United States, most cases of child abduction are not by strangers. Contrary to popular belief, most cases of child abduction are by family members of the child.
Statistics for child abduction are often misleading. For example, while the number of serious child abduction cases is remaining relatively low, the numbers of such cases are in fact declining.
Today, most child abductions are by family members, mostly parents. The vast majority of these abductions were not serious, with most children being recovered quickly. In the past, parents preached safety when talking to strangers. Today, this stranger safety education has proven less useful, as the large majority of children are taken by people they know.
Abductions by family members are more than three times more common than stranger abductions, according to the Department of Justice. The increase in the number of divorces has led to a large increase in parental child abductions. In many of these cases, the child is brought into another country. International child abduction has grown to become more of a problem as a result of increased ease of international travel. 
There is no evidence of a growth in stranger child abductions nor is there evidence for a growth in child abductions in general. Only parental and family child abductions has seen an empirical growth.
The typical impression of child abduction, especially in the United States, is that stereotypical stranger abductions are common. The truth is, however, that child abduction today mostly revolves around people whom the child knows. With the increased ease of travel and the growing number of divorces, child abductions are experiencing a statistical trend towards family abductions and away from stranger child abductions.

Returned Vs. Missing Children in Child Abductions

Returned Vs. Missing Children in Child Abductions

About half of child abductions are by family members of the child. In nearly all of these cases, the abducted child is returned to the rightful parent or parents unharmed. Having said that, statistics on child abduction have shown that children abducted by family members have mental and psychological issues stemming from the abduction.
Only 4 percent of stranger abductions led to the child never being found. In over 40 percent of stranger abduction cases, the child was murdered. The overwhelming majority of stranger kidnappings lasted less than 24 hours.
The same was true for non-family abductions, such as those by acquaintances of the child, though in these cases one-third of the abductions lasted 3 hours or less. The abducted child is returned 99 percent of the time in non-family abductions, while stranger abductions only returned the child safe 57 percent of the time.
The large majority of child abduction cases end with children being returned to their homes. That being said, when children are returned following an abduction, they can often retain harmful, damaging memories. The psychological impact of such a traumatic experience is not one that a mind not yet fully matured can easily overcome.