Reform Efforts And Groups Foster Care Independence Act

Reform Efforts And Groups Foster Care Independence Act

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Reform Efforts And Groups Foster Care Independence Act

The Foster Care Independence Act, also known as the Foster Care Independence Act of 1999, is a legislative Act that extends healthcare provisions to foster children. The Act states that foster children can be covered under Medicaid until they turn 21 years of age. It was passed to proliferate the fostering of children.

 

Due to the fact that foster children were eligible to be covered by Government-funded healthcare, families unwilling or unable to adopt could foster a child for a minimal cost. In addition, the Foster Care Independence Act prompted the doubling of Federal funding for the assistance of the health and welfare of foster children, from $70 million to $140 million.

Aside from easing the financial burden of families who engage in fostering children, the Foster Care Independence Act allows for funds to be specifically allotted in order to assist emancipated children. As a result of this Act, the Secretary of Health and Human Services instituted a change in the amount a child in foster care is allowed to save before being penalized. Under the law, children are allowed to save as much as $10,000 before it negatively impacts their eligibility or the eligibility of their foster parents to receive assistance from the Government.

This bill was an attempt to reform criticisms that such children were unprepared to face the challenges of adulthood. By extending the eligibility for assistance from the age of 18 to 21, it strove to reflect the continued support that children raised by birth parents often receive.

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