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Juvenile Probation

Understanding Juvenile Probation

Understanding Juvenile Probation

Juvenile probation is the most likely effect of a young person’s involvement with the law and with the juvenile justice system. In fact, a majority of youth offenders will have contact with a juvenile probation officer at some point in their lives, with roughly three in five juvenile court cases ending in probation. Under most circumstances, juvenile probation will be authorized by a juvenile court.         
Juvenile probation, in a way, is a kind of relief for the juvenile offender in that it may spare them the difficulties associated with court and secure detention or imprisonment. Just the same, this does not free the guilty party from his or her obligations to the law. Juvenile probation is a conditional release from bondage. In this manner, it is like a contract between the child and the State in which he or she agrees to abide by the terms of the probation. If the appointed juvenile probation officer finds a violation or pattern of non-compliance with the terms, an offender might forfeit the privileges that probation bestows upon him or her.
It should be noted that the function of juvenile probation programs and the juvenile probation officer may vary from place to place. Depending on the State, probation officers will be used to varying degrees regarding scrutiny of the child’s activities for signs of failing to adhere to probation stipulations, intake of the accused (in some cases, a juvenile probation officer has power to arrest), and assistance in proceedings against violators. In addition, officers can be involved in aftercare programs, residential youth 

What Are Court Ordered Sanctions

What Are Court Ordered Sanctions

The decision of whether or not to sentence an individual
to probation usually begins with a meeting between a defendant and a
representative of the governing probation department. Depending on the age of
the accused, this can either be a standard probation department or a juvenile probation
department.

 

The role of a juvenile probation department is often made
distinct by the idea that probation may be assigned to juvenile cases when it
should really not apply. Courts are apt to err on the side of caution, affording
first-time offenders and children at risk some leeway when it comes to
sentencing
. For some petitions of the court, the individual before the
court may not be able to pay a fine; if a juvenile defendant, he or she may
have no income, although parents may be forced to intercede in this respect. If
an adult defendant, he or she may be unemployed and/or living in poverty.

 

Where available funds fail, though, work ethic may redeem
the candidate for probation. An officer of the probation department may appeal
to the judge for court-ordered sanctions in the form of community service. As
this benefits both the offender (for whom service replaces detention) and the
community, this is a viable and beneficial option.


In addition, a juvenile probation department might determine a change
in scenery is the best thing for a delinquent child and courts will order
enrollment of a child in a school with designs toward discipline and special
skill sets. Just the same, some probation sanctions may force the sanctioned to
remain at home, as in house arrest with electronic monitoring
.

Know the History of Juvenile Probation

Know the History of Juvenile Probation

Juvenile probation in this country began in 19th Century Massachusetts with the innovative work of John Augustus. Known to historians as the “Father of Probation,” Augustus, a member of the Washington Total Abstinence Society, pioneered the concept in 1841 by making a deal on behalf of a man brought before the Boston courts, offering to take custody of the “drunkard” and reform him. Some time later, he and the parolee returned to the court and the latter was greatly improved, to everyone’s surprise. Until his death, John Augustus served as the first probation officer.
As for the juvenile probation center at the local level, serious standards and accountability really gathered steam between the 1950s and 1970s. For one, professional associations specifically devoted to representing the interests of adult and juvenile probation officers popped up across the United States and probation centers began to see more oversight at the hands of country criminal justice systems.

Understanding The Parental Responsibilities

Understanding The Parental Responsibilities

In line with the community aspect of fighting juvenile delinquency, juvenile courtits officers and the judge, as in parens patriae, is no substitute for proper adult guardianship. Granted, in some instances birth parents are absent from their children’s lives, and so by default they will not be a party to a juvenile court probation.         
Of course, for children to meet the requirements of their probation sentences, especially attending community service and juvenile probation program meetings, they must have a way of getting to those functions. As children should not travel unsupervised irrespective of age, parents must be accountable for bringing them to and from sessions. If they have the means, parents should drive children and be ready to pick them up at an appointed time of release. If not, parents will need to accompany their children between stops by way of bus or train.
More important than just providing transportation, though, parents are essential to the success of a juvenile court probation sentence in that they provide support. In some cases, parents will be able to provide advice or words of solace from an empathic standpoint, having gone through a juvenile probation program at some point in their own lives.         
In all fairness, for children and parents alike, juvenile court probation is a trying time, especially if the latter have had trouble with raising children before, they may need counseling in their own right. Some parents may have their own issues to wrestle with that have lent themselves to inhospitable home environments, such as anger problems or dependency on drugs, and therefore, must help themselves before they can help their families. Also, parents may need their own network of support in trying to cope with a child going through a juvenile probation program and might want to see an adult counselor or support group during the probation period.