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Juvenile Probation

Paying of Damages and Counseling At A Glance

Paying of Damages and Counseling At A Glance

Some rulings by a juvenile court judge or conditions of detention diversion negotiated directly with an officer of the court regarding monies are a more mild form of punishment as compared to detention. Fines do get assessed by juvenile justice systems.
Another possible outcome of recommendations made by juvenile probation officers is that children attend some more group-oriented, community-based juvenile probation programs, perhaps in tandem with individual plans outlined by appointed counselors. Not only will these treatment programs offer services like anger management and social skills training designed to confront negative influences on delinquency, but they also are another means of holding children accountable for the terms of their probation.

Read This Before Violating Probation

Read This Before Violating Probation

The general idea of probation is for delinquents to keep their noses clean and not do anything associated with delinquent behavior. After all, the word “probation” originates from Latin and implies that the parolee must pass some sort of test and prove his or her mettle. By this token, any violation of the law reported by an appointed probation officer will have negative consequences. Even if no specific laws are broken, delinquents may break the terms of a probation agreement and still be deemed guilty of violating probation.
There are general conditions to probation that must be upheld for the duration of the probationary period, which may be broadly encapsulated by the term “good behavior” and more narrowly defined by the probation officer in a particular case. In addition, all sanctions must be performed or otherwise fulfilled by the delinquent. This includes paying all fines and monies assessed.         
Violations of the law and probation during the probationary period may serve to dispel any leeway afforded to delinquents the first time around. With regard to the former, of course, additional criminal charges must be judged on their own merits, and if severe enough, could land juvenile offenders in an adult correctional facility. For general violations of probation, meanwhile, a delinquent will almost certainly be requested to appear before a juvenile court and, if found guilty, face detention or commitment to a secure facility.  

Understanding Juvenile Probation

Understanding Juvenile Probation

Juvenile probation is the most likely effect of a young person’s involvement with the law and with the juvenile justice system. In fact, a majority of youth offenders will have contact with a juvenile probation officer at some point in their lives, with roughly three in five juvenile court cases ending in probation. Under most circumstances, juvenile probation will be authorized by a juvenile court.         
Juvenile probation, in a way, is a kind of relief for the juvenile offender in that it may spare them the difficulties associated with court and secure detention or imprisonment. Just the same, this does not free the guilty party from his or her obligations to the law. Juvenile probation is a conditional release from bondage. In this manner, it is like a contract between the child and the State in which he or she agrees to abide by the terms of the probation. If the appointed juvenile probation officer finds a violation or pattern of non-compliance with the terms, an offender might forfeit the privileges that probation bestows upon him or her.
It should be noted that the function of juvenile probation programs and the juvenile probation officer may vary from place to place. Depending on the State, probation officers will be used to varying degrees regarding scrutiny of the child’s activities for signs of failing to adhere to probation stipulations, intake of the accused (in some cases, a juvenile probation officer has power to arrest), and assistance in proceedings against violators. In addition, officers can be involved in aftercare programs, residential youth 

What Are Court Ordered Sanctions

What Are Court Ordered Sanctions

The decision of whether or not to sentence an individual
to probation usually begins with a meeting between a defendant and a
representative of the governing probation department. Depending on the age of
the accused, this can either be a standard probation department or a juvenile probation
department.

 

The role of a juvenile probation department is often made
distinct by the idea that probation may be assigned to juvenile cases when it
should really not apply. Courts are apt to err on the side of caution, affording
first-time offenders and children at risk some leeway when it comes to
sentencing
. For some petitions of the court, the individual before the
court may not be able to pay a fine; if a juvenile defendant, he or she may
have no income, although parents may be forced to intercede in this respect. If
an adult defendant, he or she may be unemployed and/or living in poverty.

 

Where available funds fail, though, work ethic may redeem
the candidate for probation. An officer of the probation department may appeal
to the judge for court-ordered sanctions in the form of community service. As
this benefits both the offender (for whom service replaces detention) and the
community, this is a viable and beneficial option.


In addition, a juvenile probation department might determine a change
in scenery is the best thing for a delinquent child and courts will order
enrollment of a child in a school with designs toward discipline and special
skill sets. Just the same, some probation sanctions may force the sanctioned to
remain at home, as in house arrest with electronic monitoring
.