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International Adoption

Easy Overview of International Adoption

Easy Overview of International Adoption

Some people might not equate adopting a child with the law because a trial by jury is not involved. Just because an adoption claim is not heard in criminal court, though, does not mean adopting a foreign-born boy or girl is not a legal process.
American adoption law is tied to its immigration law. After adopting a child from a foreign country, parents must apply for an IR-3 immigrant visa for his or her transport back to the United States, or prior to adopting him or her (thus, planning to complete the adoption in the U.S.), must petition an American embassy or consulate for an IR-4 visa.
In addition, upon formalization of the adoption, they must request that the child becomes a naturalized citizen. With the passage of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000, the acquisition of citizenship became a more streamlined, (almost) automatic process.
Obviously, in adopting a child from a foreign country, that nation’s standards must be met. Before even considering what is acceptable abroad, however, applicants must first make sure the adoption is acceptable according to the United States Government.
One legal distinction that is prone to inconsistencies across international lines is the definition of an “orphan,” which U.S. law requires an adoptee to be. Whereas a foreign court may decide that any child relinquished by his or her birth parents to an agency can be adopted.         
Oftentimes, international adoptions in foreign courts will be recognized in their American counterparts, but it should be noted that a United States judicial body is not guaranteed to oblige, especially in the absence of an official adoption decree. When adopting a child in a foreign country and bringing him or her to live in the U.S., it may be worth adopting him or her a second time after arrival to make sure the child’s status is legal.
International adoption law can be confusing. In case of any questions on intercountry adoptions, be they big or small, it is worthwhile to consult both the Department of State/a consular office and a reputable national adoption organization.

Understanding the General Process to Adoption

Understanding the General Process to Adoption

Adopting a child is seldom a simple process, and national borders and oceans only serve to complicate matters. Some couples may get mentally locked into adopting a child from one particular country, only to have their hopes dashed by a flat-out refusal from that nation to accommodate their adoption request. International adoptions demand flexibility of those who pursue their methods.
Several factors may have to be considered before prospective adoptive parents actually go through with contacting another country’s authorities, including any eligibility requirements that may serve to disqualify them (the parents), average wait times for adoptions to be processed, and average costs of an adoption in that country.
Consideration must also be shown for whether or not a country is a party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Though not always mandatory, it is nonetheless strongly urged of couples seeking international adoptions to enlist the services of an international adoption agency when applicable.
On top of the above, adopting a child from a foreign land is almost guaranteed to involve travel to the potential adoptee’s home country and a period of temporary residence there. Prospective adoptive parents interacting with an agency will want to see that travel fees and all other costs that could arise in international adoptions are outlined in an easy-to-follow chronological schedule.

International Adoption Overview

International Adoption Overview

International adoption allows hopeful families to provide a safe and loving home for a child facing poverty and possible desolation. International adoptions require collaboration between both countries and the prospective family with the desired adoption agency.         
Some approach international adoptions wearily because of preconceived notions on treatment practices in foreign orphanages. These sentiments often reflect worries that children up for international adoption maintain certain developmental disadvantages that will continue through the child’s life. Although these anxieties can be real, often hopeful families can express these concerns to adoption agencies and together can determine if international adoption is for them. 
International adoptions have actually decreased in the last few years, possibly due to changes in United Nations guidelines forcing new expectation levels for prospective families. These international adoption guidelines should help ease anxieties over child abduction and the possible lack of care for children in certain poverty-stricken areas.
International adoptions increased steadily throughout the 1990s, and although it has decreased slightly in the past few years it is likely the rates will again continue to rise in coming years. Hopeful families should develop a comprehensive plan and lay out specific expectations from the adoption process.

Be Aware of the Problems with International Adoption

Be Aware of the Problems with International Adoption

International adoption is a positive force in the United States in legally bringing children to the country from cultures and nations that enrich our understanding of the world and potentially save these children from a life of hardships in their countries of origin. That said, international adoption policies of different nations may make it difficult for some individuals to appreciate the benefits of adoption from country-state to country-state.
Even when international adoption policy is not an issue, though, the logistics of international adoption can be too much for applicants to reckon with, prompting them to seek out other arrangements. In short, intercountry adoption is laden with potential hurdles for prospective parents. The following is a partial list of possible problems with international adoption:
Though some couples might be ecstatic with any child to call their own, a number of other couples will be insistent on bringing a baby into their midst. Unfortunately for them, infant children are next to impossible to obtain across international lines, and for various reasons. One particularly evident reason is that international adoption takes time.
Of course, this assumes that international adoption policies of foreign nations are static, unchangeable creations. On the contrary, as American states may arbitrarily change their statutes, so may any individual country set upon modification of its international adoption policy. In fact, from year to year, eligibility of foreign nationals to adopt from a certain territory may be amended if not totally eliminated altogether. 
Another complication brought about by international adoption policies, and to some applicants the most important of them all, is the total price of intercountry adoption. As international adoption policy is instrumental in determining the fees of child adoption from accredited adoption agencies, prices must be researched on a case-by-case basis.
No matter what country one adopts from and no matter how lenient its international adoption policies are, in finalizing a transfer of custody, new adoptive parents should expect to pay costs.
Certainly, the realities of international adoption should not scare prospective parents. After all, for thousands of Americans each year, the process is a success. Nevertheless, they should be fully committed to adoption from a foreign country.